Literary Criticism/Cultural Studies

HOLIDAY SALE: Select books only $5, $10, or 50% off!

by Lauren Stachew November 26, 2016

As you begin your search for gifts this holiday season, look no further than the University of Michigan Press! Our holiday sale features a variety of classics, favorites, conversation starters, and new titles – all at a variety of discounts. Use discount code UMHOL16, valid through January 2, 2017. GO BLUE    NATURE          MICHIGAN HISTORY     CONTAINING MULTITUDES                              

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Halloween and Humanism

by Jenny Geyer October 31, 2016

The following is a blog post written by Dina Khapaeva, Professor at the School of Modern Languages, Georgia Tech, and author of The Celebration of Death in Contemporary Culture, forthcoming from the University of Michigan Press in spring 2017.   Halloween is upon us, a time when the suburbs of any American city can be found covered with images of death, most of them about as realistically revolting as they can be;  rotting corpses, mutilated body parts, skulls and crossbones, and skeletons—skeletons of all sizes, standing, hanging, carrying coffins. Already by late September, some of the most exclusive neighborhoods, where funeral […]

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Black History Month Spotlight: ‘Dreams for Dead Bodies’

by Kasie Pleiness February 4, 2016

Throughout February, the University of Michigan Press will be featuring several titles for Black History Month. In Dreams for Dead Bodies: Blackness, Labor, and the Corpus of American Detective Fiction, M. Michelle Robinson offers new arguments about the origins of detective fiction in the United States, tracing the lineage of the genre back to unexpected texts and uncovering how authors such as Edgar Allan Poe, Mark Twain, Pauline Hopkins, and Rudolph Fisher made use of the genre’s puzzle-elements to explore the shifting dynamics of race and labor in America. According to Robinson, the narrative elements necessary to any good crime […]

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Seeing Beyond Amazing: Is Sesame Street really changing the way we understand autism?

by Sam Killian December 14, 2015

This is a guest post by Anne McGuire, author of the University of Michigan Press forthcoming title, War on Autism. Seeing Beyond Amazing: Is Sesame Street really changing the way we understand autism? The Sesame Workshop, the non-profit educational organization behind Sesame Street, made international headlines and lit up social media last month with the introduction of its newest Muppet character, Julia. With wispy orange hair and bright green eyes, Julia is, according to Sesame: “a preschool girl with autism who does things a little differently when playing with her friends”. Julia is more than a just another person in the neighbourhood, […]

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Emily Wilding Davison and the British Women’s Suffragette Movement

by Kasie Pleiness November 19, 2015

Suffragette, starring Carey Mulligan and Meryl Streep, is a British historical drama inspired by true events from the early British feminist movement. The film focuses on Maud Watts, a fictional 24-year-old laundress who testifies in front of Parliament for the right to vote. She is thrown in jail, where she meets Emily Wilding Davison, a real life heroine of the early feminist movement and friend of activist Emmeline Pankhurst. Davison was at the center of one of the most memorable images of the British women’s suffrage movement — one that provides a key moment in the new film. On June […]

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