Literary Criticism/Cultural Studies

Sales on New Titles from U-M Press

by Shaun Manning October 20, 2015
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Are you on University of Michigan Press’s email lists? If so, you’ll know about the great deals we offer on all of our latest titles to help you keep up with the latest research in your field. If you haven’t yet signed up, here are a few promotion codes to get you started — enter them at checkout to save 30% on any edition of the title! Reading for the Planet: Toward a Geomethodology by Christian Moraru – code UMPLANET Campaign Finance and Political Polarization: When Purists Prevail by Raymond J. La Raja and Brian F. Schaffner – code UMPURIST […]

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Welcome Back Sale – 20% Off All Titles

by Shaun Manning June 15, 2015
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The dust has begun to settle from our June 1 move to Chicago Distribution Center, our website ordering functionality is restored, and we are pressing forward with some exciting new initiatives. To thank you, our customers and colleagues, for your patience during the transition, through June 30 we are offering 20% off your entire order — use promotion code UMCDC at checkout to receive the discount. This offer is good on print and ebooks, including ELT titles — mix and match, go wild! Check out our new releases, browse by category or series, or preorder upcoming titles in our Fall […]

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Announcing the Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities

by Shaun Manning March 26, 2015
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The Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities The work of the late Tobin Siebers has influenced Disability Studies in field-shifting ways since the publication of his prize-winning essay “My Withered Limb” in 1998. His subsequent scholarly publications including the books Disability Theory (2008) and Disability Aesthetics (2010) as well as essays such as “A Sexual Culture for Disabled People” (2012) quickly became pivotal works in the field. Siebers’s work has galvanized new scholarship in relation to questions of representation, subjectivity, and the entry of non-normative bodies into public space, and made the study of disability a central […]

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John Oliver on the NCAA

by Phillip Witteveen March 25, 2015
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In its most recent episode, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver did some muckraking on the controversies of “amateur” student-athletics; as one of his rapid-fire segments, Oliver reported: “Fun fact: The very first executive director of the NCAA stated that he ‘crafted’ the term ‘student-athlete’ in the 1950s, explicitly to avoid worker’s comp for injured athletes. And 60 years later, that term is still working.” That “very first executive director” was Walter Byers, during whose long tenure (’51 – ’87), the NCAA became a multi-million dollar commercial enterprise (with, for example, 68.2 million on the table for televising the NCAA’s ’88 basketball season). In this way, Byers has had a far-reaching influence in […]

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Philip Levine, 1928-2015

by Phillip Witteveen February 20, 2015
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Philip Levine passed away over the weekend, on Saturday the 14th. His poetry was recognized with two National Book Awards, a Pulitzer, and with an appointment as a U.S. poet laureate. Levine was one of the first (and most prominent) poets to really put his hometown, Detroit, into verse. He found a plainspoken language to mourn with, to give pause, to join rafters in his native mise en scène—a language to tell stories of people just getting off the graveyard shift. He started writing poetry when he was only thirteen. In Levine’s work, there was always a way of recognizing aspects of the everyday as poetry; in […]

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