Podcast

Kristin Goss Featured on “New Books in Political Science”

by Phillip Witteveen March 24, 2014
pge

Kristin Goss recently spoke with Heath Brown for the New Books in Political Science podcast, where she discussed her book The Paradox of Gender Equality, a look at “women’s civic place” as it has changed over a 100 year period.  In the book, Goss examines the evolution women’s public interests and the parallel evolution of “women’s presence on Capitol Hill” from the late 19th century to the present day. “You didn’t pull off a little project,” says host Heath Brown, “this is a big project.” Goss recounted two stories from early in Paradox, which serve to capture the main argument of the book. […]

Read more

Peter Alegi discusses the legacy of ‘Africa’s World Cup’ on New Books in Sports

by Phillip Witteveen September 17, 2013
9780472051946

Peter Alegi appeared on New Books in Sports to discuss Africa’s World Cup: Critical Reflections on Play, Patriotism, Spectatorship, and Space. Co-edited with Chris Bolsmann, Africa’s World Cup is a collection of essays, travelogues and ethnographies that attempt to get a better grasp of the further-reaching cultural and political implications of the historic 2010 FIFA tournament. Alegi, who is originally from Rome, drew parallels to the ancient Roman ideology of “bread and circus,”  those things needed to appease the populace, as “the first politicization of sports.” “Politicians all over the African continent  (particularly after independence which for most countries in Africa, came […]

Read more

Sheryl James Featured on “Stateside”

by Phillip Witteveen May 20, 2013
9780472051748

Sheryl James was a guest on Michigan Radio’s Stateside to discuss her new book Michigan Legends: Folktales and Lore from the Great Lakes State. James, a former journalist, comprehensively researched Michigan’s folk traditions from archives and storytellers to gain a full understanding of the fact and fiction of the state’s mythology. “There’s a huge range of total fantasy, as well as pretty historical kinds of things,” said James. One famous story is of the Nain Rouge, “this little red, impish creature that has been known to appear right before Detroit’s greatest tragedies.” This character has persisted in the city’s cultural memory, […]

Read more

Andreá Williams talks ‘Dividing Lines’ on New Books in African American Studies

by Phillip Witteveen May 17, 2013
9780472118618

Author Andreá Williams joined host Vershawn Young to talk about her new book Dividing Lines: Class Anxiety and Postbellum Black Fiction on the New Books Network’s New Books in African American Studies. The book examines the beginnings of class anxiety and intraracial class tensions in postbellum black communities as they manifest themselves in the literature of that time period. Williams incorporates the fiction of such authors as Sutton E. Griggs, Charles Chesnutt, and W.E.B. DuBois, as the first generations of freed men and women came to terms with their new social status.  Her perspective on this more complex culture was framed by […]

Read more

Joseph Geha discusses ‘Lebanese Blonde’ on Iowa Public Radio

by Brianne Johnson February 13, 2013
More Book Details

Lebanese Blonde may be a work of fiction, but, for author Joseph Geha, the novel hits close to home. That home is in the “Little Syria” community of Toledo, Ohio, and during an interview that recently aired on Iowa Public Radio, Geha discussed the places, experiences, and people that inspired the book. “The people are made up,” Geha said in the interview with “Talk of Iowa,” “But they’re founded on people I grew up with.” As an example, Geha names his father as a dominant source of inspiration for a character named Uncle Waxy. He also describes the urgency to “work hard [and] […]

Read more