1950s

Announcing the Backlist Digital Project

by Kathryn Beaton January 19, 2017

In 2017, the University of Michigan is celebrating its bicentennial. All year, a variety of commemorative events will be taking place across campus. Here at the University of Michigan Press/Michigan Publishing, we have launched our Backlist Digital Project, which features 200 titles that were published through the decades. While the Press is younger than the university as a whole, we’ve been publishing books, in different iterations, for over one hundred years. In autumn 2016, we undertook a project to release paperback versions of 200 previously out-of-print backlist titles. In a year where we are proudly celebrating 200 years of excellence […]

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HOLIDAY SALE: Select books only $5, $10, or 50% off!

by Lauren Stachew November 26, 2016

As you begin your search for gifts this holiday season, look no further than the University of Michigan Press! Our holiday sale features a variety of classics, favorites, conversation starters, and new titles – all at a variety of discounts. Use discount code UMHOL16, valid through January 2, 2017.   GO BLUE      NATURE              MICHIGAN HISTORY       CONTAINING MULTITUDES                                      

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Throwback Thursday: 102 Years of Michigan Trees

by Kasie Pleiness November 12, 2015

Michigan Trees: A Guide to the Trees of the Great Lakes Region is the must-have reference book for anyone who wants to learn about the trees of this unique North American region. The first edition of Michigan Trees was published in 1913 and preceded the University of Michigan Press by 17 years. After the Press was founded, a second edition was released under our imprint in 1931. New editions have been released every 20 or so years since then, appearing in 1954, 1972, 1981, and most recently, in 2004. While previous editions of the book had focused on identification, the […]

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John Oliver on the NCAA

by Phillip Witteveen March 25, 2015

In its most recent episode, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver did some muckraking on the controversies of “amateur” student-athletics; as one of his rapid-fire segments, Oliver reported: “Fun fact: The very first executive director of the NCAA stated that he ‘crafted’ the term ‘student-athlete’ in the 1950s, explicitly to avoid worker’s comp for injured athletes. And 60 years later, that term is still working.” That “very first executive director” was Walter Byers, during whose long tenure (’51 – ’87), the NCAA became a multi-million dollar commercial enterprise (with, for example, 68.2 million on the table for televising the NCAA’s ’88 basketball season). In this way, Byers has had a far-reaching influence in […]

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Remembering Gordon Tullock

by Carolyn Darr November 14, 2014
Calculus of Consent by James M. Buchanan and Gordon Tullock

Gordon Tullock, one of the founding fathers of public choice theory, passed away November 4th at the age of 92. Originally intending to be a foreign trader, Tullock only took one economics class in his university studies, yet went on to completely change economic thinking by applying it to political issues. Along with his long time collaborator James Buchanan, Tullock produced The Calculus of Consent: Logical Foundations of Constitutional Democracy, a groundbreaking work in the new field of public choice. Growing up in Rockford, Illinois, Tullock attended the University of Chicago where he earned a J.D. in 1947 after serving […]

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