Abu Ghraib

Christian S. Davis offers a past and present look at military actions abroad

by Emily February 23, 2012

Guest blogger Christian S. Davis is the author of Colonialism, Antisemitism, and Germans of Jewish Descent in Imperial Germany, available now from the University of Michigan Press. In his book, Davis explores the relationship between the colonial and antisemitic movements of modern Germany from 1871 to 1918. Here, he discusses the unease he felt when comparing his research to current events that were unfolding as he was writing. The spring of 2004 was a disheartening time to read a newspaper or to watch the news on TV; beginning in April, revelations concerning the torture of Iraqi prisoners by U.S. military […]

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In Search of Understanding On the First Anniversary of the Publishing of the Torture Memos

by kris bishop March 23, 2010

As we approach the first anniversary of the release of “The Torture Memos,” where do we stand? Can we even now define “torture” in state practice? John Yoo, Jay Bybee, and the other authors of the torture memos have pushed the boundary one way, members of the Obama camp the other, and yet, Lewis and Clark Law School Professor John T. Parry says, even if we reach a solid definition of torture in hopes of prohibiting it, that prohibition will not end such practices. In new release Understanding Torture: Law, Violence, and Political Identity, Parry explains that torture is already […]

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“Sacred Violence: Torture, Terror, and Sovereignty” by Paul Kahn

by kris bishop September 29, 2008

PUBLISHER’S NOTE: The cover of our controversial new book Sacred Violence: Torture, Terror, and Soveriegnty, by Paul Kahn, boasts a work of art called “Abu Ghraib” by Columbian artist Fernando Botero. Author Paul Kahn writes from the controversial perspective that although we as Americans despise torture on the “civilized” level, we cannot escape a deeper fascination and dependence on it in the face of the War on Terror (check out Kahn’s guest author blog entry “Who Are We?”) and Botero’s art supports this deep, disturbing realization, making for a similarly powerful and thought-provoking cover. Fernando Botero Angulo (born April 19, […]

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Who Are We? or, The Presidential Debate Question: Are we torturers?

by kris bishop September 29, 2008

PUBLISHER’S NOTE: See below for commentary from Paul W. Kahn, author of the new release Sacred Violence: Torture, Terror, and Sovereignty, a deeply thoughtful look at the constitutional, moral, and practical aspects of what it means to be Americans and condone the torture of others, and check out our blog entry FAT PEOPLE, focusing on Colombian artist Fernando Botero and the cover art of Sacred Violence. ______________________________ PAUL KAHN: “Many Americans find torture apalling when it comes up, but have seldom wondered why we focus so heavily on the subject.  Other forms of violence are far more destructive, yet they […]

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