american poetry

Interview with Poet and Professor Philip Metres

by Kathryn Beaton October 1, 2018

Our new Fulcrum Community Manager, Emma DiPasquale, studied under our author Philip Metres at John Carroll University. Below, she interviews him about his new book The Sound of Listening: Poetry as Refuge and Resistance, which was released in September. He also will be visiting Ann Arbor to read (with author Aimee Bender) on November 15.   You join over a hundred other poets who have contributed to the Poets on Poetry series. What drew you to it? When I was in graduate school researching poets and the peace movement, I first encountered the series through volumes by the poet William Stafford: You […]

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Remembering the 1967 Detroit Riot, part 5: “All that was hidden burning on the oil-stained earth”

by Brian Matzke July 23, 2017

“All that was hidden burning on the oil-stained earth”: Detroit since the riot Don’t Ask Philip Levine So Ask Essays, Conversations, and Interviews Philip Levine The Bread of Time Toward an Autobiography Philip Levine Detroit Is No Dry Bones The Eternal City of the Industrial Age Camilo José Vergara The Unreal Estate Guide to Detroit Andrew Herscher The legacy of the riots can be felt in the poetry of the U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Philip Levine, whose “They Feed They Lion” was inspired by his visit to his hometown of Detroit after the riots, and his feelings […]

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‘Hog Butchers’ author John Marsh discusses poets and the poor in Huffington Post

by Shaun Manning March 15, 2012

John Marsh, author of the recent U-M Press title Hog Butchers, Beggars, and Busboys: Poverty, Labor, and the Making of Modern American Poetry, offered his insights on the development of American poetry with the Huffington Post. Addressing the focus of poets like William Carlos Williams on the lives of the very poor–a topic Marsh examines in depth in his book–the author writes, When they started out, in the 1910s and 1920s, what modern poets hated most about the then-contemporary verse was all its artificialities: its metronome-like iambic pentameters, its moon-and-June rhymes, its puffed up diction, its watercolor portraits of nature […]

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