disability studies

Interview with William Cheng, winner of the 2016 AMS Philip Brett Award

by Sam Killian November 11, 2016

We at University of Michigan Press are pleased to share that William Cheng’s new book, Just Vibrations: The Purpose of Sounding Good, received this year’s Philip Brett Award from the American Musicological Society. Philip Brett (1937–2002) was a beloved professor and a pioneer of queer music scholarship. The book, an urgent treatise on the ethical stakes of contemporary musical scholarship and citizenship, was celebrated during the AMS annual meeting. During this meeting (which happened to take place this year in Cheng’s hometown of Vancouver, British Columbia), the Society praised Just Vibrations, calling it “a nuanced and intersectional work that meets concerns […]

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Celebrating 20 Years of Corporealities

by Charles Watkinson October 11, 2016

On October 11 author Ann McGuire gives the inaugural Tobin Siebers Prize Lecture at the University of Michigan. Professor McGuire is the winner of the inaugural Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies, named in honor of the pioneering scholar and father of disability studies. In the blog post below, Professor David Mitchell of George Washington University, co-editor of the successful book series Corporealities (in which McGuire’s book appears) reflects on the series’ contribution to the field. Corporealities: Discourses of Disability Series Overview will turn 20 years old in 2017. It is now the longest running academic book series devoted exclusively […]

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Kress grant funds University of Michigan for Workshop on Guidelines for Describing Arts and Humanities Visual Resources

by Jonathan McGlone June 27, 2016

The University of Michigan Library and Press have received $10,000 from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation to fund a workshop in fall 2016 focused on the development of guidelines for describing visual resources within digital publications. Textual description of visual resources is a requirement for accessible digital publications and fundamental to the discoverability and sustainability of visual content in the digital publishing ecosystem. The workshop will bring together professionals from the fields of art and art history, disability studies and accessibility, academic and museum publishing, and libraries, museums, and archives for a day-and-a-half workshop. Stakeholders, including partners from Benetech, a […]

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May is Mental Health Awareness Month

by Lauren Stachew May 19, 2016

This month marks the 67th annual Mental Health Awareness Month. The importance of observing this month is crucial when one looks at the statistics: approximately one in four American adults experience a mental health disorder in a given year. Yet to this day, a serious stigma still surrounds mental illness. According to the CDC, only 25 percent of people with mental health issues feel that other people are compassionate and sympathetic towards them. Huffington Post author Lindsay Holmes writes in the article ‘What If People Treated Physical Illness Like Mental Illness?’ that “…despite the staggering evidence and rhetoric aimed at […]

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Interview with Author Anne McGuire on Autism Awareness and Accessibility in Publishing

by Sam Killian April 18, 2016

Disability studies scholar Anne McGuire’s War on Autism: On the Cultural Logic of Normative Violence takes a critical look at autism awareness campaigns.  Scheduled for publication next month, the book will be the first to follow the Press’s new accessibility guidelines. Below the author discusses her goals for the book and how she worked to ensure its accessibility for readers with print disabilities. April is Autism Awareness Month. What is the relationship of your book to autism awareness campaigns, and did you have particular audiences in mind when you wrote it? War on Autism takes a critical look at mainstream […]

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