gender

“Animal Acts” Now on Fulcrum

by Kathryn Beaton January 11, 2017

The University of Michigan Press/Michigan Publishing is proud to announce the launch of new video content on its publishing platform, Fulcrum. Animal Acts: Performing Species Today, a multidisciplinary anthology, is the first book from University of Michigan Press to have material on Fulcrum. The book examines how personal anecdotes about animals influence our understanding of what it means to be human. Eleven leading theater artists share their stories in this collection, and the writing—which explores race, gender, sexuality, class, nation, and environment—is accompanied by scholarly commentary. Because the text references visual aspects of the work, the ability to now see clips […]

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Celebrate Pride with UM Press

by Lauren Stachew June 23, 2016

This month is the 47th annual LGBT Pride Month, which began in June 1969 to commemorate the Stonewall riots in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village. This commemorative month not only celebrates sexual diversity and gender variance, but also increases visibility and emphasizes positivity and self-love in the LGBT community. Parades, marches, rallies, and commemorations are held across the world annually during this month. Performing Queer Latinidad by Ramón H. Rivera-Servera highlights the critical role that performance played in the development of Latina/o queer public culture in the United States during the 1990s and early 2000s, a period when the size and influence […]

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2016 Call for Submissions: Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities

by Charles Watkinson January 30, 2016

Submissions are now invited for the 2016 Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities The work of the late Tobin Siebers has influenced Disability Studies in field-shifting ways since the publication of his prize-winning essay “My Withered Limb” in 1998. His subsequent scholarly publications including the books Disability Theory (2008) and Disability Aesthetics (2010) as well as essays such as “A Sexual Culture for Disabled People” (2012) quickly became pivotal works in the field. Siebers’s work has galvanized new scholarship in relation to questions of representation, subjectivity, and the entry of non-normative bodies into public space, and made […]

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Announcing the Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities

by Shaun Manning March 26, 2015

The Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities The work of the late Tobin Siebers has influenced Disability Studies in field-shifting ways since the publication of his prize-winning essay “My Withered Limb” in 1998. His subsequent scholarly publications including the books Disability Theory (2008) and Disability Aesthetics (2010) as well as essays such as “A Sexual Culture for Disabled People” (2012) quickly became pivotal works in the field. Siebers’s work has galvanized new scholarship in relation to questions of representation, subjectivity, and the entry of non-normative bodies into public space, and made the study of disability a central […]

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Kristin Goss Featured on “New Books in Political Science”

by Phillip Witteveen March 24, 2014

Kristin Goss recently appeared on the New Books in Political Science podcast, where she discussed her book The Paradox of Gender Equality. Her monograph is an examination of “women’s civic place” during 120 years of historical change. From the late 19th century, to the present day, Goss considers the evolution of women’s public interests—and the parallel evolution of “women’s presence on Capitol Hill”. “You didn’t pull off a little project,” says host Heath Brown, “this is a big project.” To break it down, Goss recounted two stories from Paradox, which capture the main argument of the book. The first took place in the wake of the Second World […]

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