music

Publishing, Poetry, and the Future: Reflecting on the 2015 Bear River Writers’ Conference

by Allison Peters July 27, 2015

The weekend May sprung into June, I attended the 2015 Bear River Writers’ Conference at Camp Michigania up on Walloon Lake (where Ernest Hemingway used to spend his summers as a kid), 250 miles north of Ann Arbor, a little south of Petoskey. Sponsored by the University of Michigan Department of English, Bear River is rich with writing workshops, readings, panels (often related to publishing), and craft talks. Directed by University of Michigan faculty member and poet Keith Taylor, the annual conference—now in its fifteenth year—is regularly attended by some of the University’s most prestigious creative writing faculty as well […]

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Tzachi Zamir on His Philosophy of Acting

by Phillip Witteveen February 4, 2015

Tzachi Zamir is a professor of philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. After a Ph.D. of pondering the nature of things, his accidental experiences with amateur acting led him to ponder the nature of performance. Zamir is the author of the first systematic philosophy of theater, Acts. This is not the first time he has tackled less-traditional philosophy, actually, having written about subjects from Shakespeare to vegetarianism to animal rights. Nowadays, though, in the interstices between professional philosophizing, he’s been taking classes, and working in rehearsal for a production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” The Israeli newspaper […]

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Francesca Royster’s ‘Sounding Like a No-No’ Receives Honorable Mention

by Phillip Witteveen December 18, 2014

Every year, the Modern Language Association awards the William Sanders Scarborough Prize to the most outstanding contribution in studies of black literature or culture. The Press is proud to announce our own honorable mention, Francesca Royster’s Sounding Like a No-No. Royster’s work places us in an era she calls “Post Soul”, and examines the eccentricities of its performance art and music. It asks us to consider the concepts of “embodied sound”, the distinctions between imaginative and corporeal freedom, and this irreducible sense of being in a world after slavery. Congratulations to Professor Royster! You can read more about the William Sanders Scarborough […]

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On Jazz, Poetry, and Hayden Carruth: Talking Shop about the Human Condition

by Phillip Witteveen September 26, 2014

WPFW, 89.3 FM, is a station that gets into the “mix of jazz, Third World music, news and public affairs.” It is the sound alternative programming makes in the metro D.C. area, “challenging the norm, and passionately serving the under-served of our community.” Coming to us in .mp3: a filmy, dulcet jazz bottoms out into the introduction of a very small, very niche radio show, with a very specific mandate: “This, is your station for jazz and justice.” The show, as it would be revealed, is called “On the Margin.” “And my name,” says the speaker, “is Giovanni Russonello.” “Today” (says […]

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Craig Maki Featured on Detroit’s Channel 4

by Phillip Witteveen September 12, 2014

“When you think of music associated with Detroit, you instantly think about Motown, jazz,” says Channel 4 news anchor Guy Gordon.  “Electronica comes to mind,” he says. “But there’s another genre you need to consider,” says Karen Drew, rounding out the other half of the classic two-anchor combo. “And that is Rockabilly—country, rock and blues combined—and it really has deep roots in Detroit, but not a lot of people realize that.” Channel 4’s Uniquely Detroit then cuts to a potpourri of video footage. The soundbites, sampled from the old stars of the Rockabilly scene, go from Johnny Powers of Utica, Michigan, who recorded alongside […]

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