podcast

Blaine Pardoe discusses ‘Secret Witness’ on ‘It’s a Crime’

by Brianne Johnson October 24, 2012

As described by Margaret McLean, host of “It’s a Crime,” Blaine Pardoe is “dredging up the past, stirring the pot, and revisiting — reopening — wounds by discussing a controversial case that rocked the small town of Marshall, Michigan” in Secret Witness: The Untold Story of the 1967 Bombing in Marshall, Michigan. In the interview (which starts at the 48-minute mark of the podcast), Pardoe discusses the “remarkable” forensic investigation that was conducted in an effort to find out who killed a well-liked woman with a mail bomb “in the days pre-CSI [and] pre-DNA-testing; done with hands-on police work.” Secret Witness, which Publishers Weekly compared to […]

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‘LGBT Youth’ authors take to radio, Boston Globe, Huffington Post

by Shaun Manning June 13, 2012

Jason Cianciotto and Sean Cahill’s new book, LGBT Youth in America’s Schools, has been receiving glowing reviews from a variety of publications, including the School Library Journal, Instinct magazine, Gay Calgary Magazine, and This Week in Texas. The authors have also been very active in advocating their book’s themes, penning op-eds in the Rainbow Times and Boston Globe, conducting a Voice to Voice feature for the Huffington Post, and appearing on Wisconsin Public Radio’s Joy Cardin Show. “Young people are coming out at younger ages,” Cahill told Cardin’s audience. “Back in the 1980s, people came out maybe around age 20, […]

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New York Times calls Karlawish’s historical novel “marvelous”

by Shaun Manning November 29, 2011

The New York Times reviewed Dr. Jason Karlawish’s historical novel Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont, praising its precise treatment of the doctor/patient relationship–in particular, the unique doctor/patient relationship that existed between frontier physicial Dr. William Beaumont and gut-shot trapper Alexis St. Martin in the early 19th century. Setting the unusual circumstances of Beaumont’s care in the context of more familiar terms–and suggesting that, despite radical advancements in the fields of medicine, some things never change–the Times said: The relationship between doctor and patient is hard enough to parse when both are in the same room. When […]

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Q&A with Jennifer Gabrys, author of Digital Rubbish

by University of Michigan Press July 5, 2011

Digital Rubbish: A Natural History of Electronics describes the materiality of electronics from a unique perspective, examining the multiple forms of waste that electronics create as evidence of the resources, labor, and imaginaries that are bundled into these machines. By drawing on the material analysis developed by Walter Benjamin, this natural history method allows for an inquiry into electronics that focuses neither on technological progression nor on great inventors but rather considers the ways in which electronic technologies fail and decay. Ranging across studies of media and technology, as well as environments, geography, and design, Jennifer Gabrys pulls together the […]

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Q&A with Theo Cateforis, author of Are We Not New Wave?

by University of Michigan Press May 4, 2011

New wave emerged at the turn of the 1980s as a pop music movement cast in the image of punk rock’s sneering demeanor, yet rendered more accessible and sophisticated. Artists such as the Cars, Devo, the Talking Heads, and the Human League leapt into the Top 40 with a novel sound that broke with the staid rock clichés of the 1970s and pointed the way to a more modern pop style. In Are We Not New Wave? Theo Cateforis provides the first musical and cultural history of the new wave movement, charting its rise out of mid-1970s punk to its […]

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