poetry

Interview with Poet and Professor Philip Metres

by Kathryn Beaton October 1, 2018

Our new Fulcrum Community Manager, Emma DiPasquale, studied under our author Philip Metres at John Carroll University. Below, she interviews him about his new book The Sound of Listening: Poetry as Refuge and Resistance, which was released in September. He also will be visiting Ann Arbor to read (with author Aimee Bender) on November 15.   You join over a hundred other poets who have contributed to the Poets on Poetry series. What drew you to it? When I was in graduate school researching poets and the peace movement, I first encountered the series through volumes by the poet William Stafford: You […]

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Former Poet Laureate and U-M Press Author Donald Hall dies at 89

by Charles Watkinson June 25, 2018

Donald Hall’s passing not only marks a great loss for the world of poetry but for the University of Michigan community. He was a member of the University’s faculty for 17 years and the author or editor of multiple Press books. His influence continues as the following tribute from Ariel Everitt shows. Ariel is a current U-M student in English and Creative Writing and is a marketing intern at the Press this summer: “Donald Hall, admirer of the rural and one of the last masters of his poetic generation, died Saturday night at Eagle Pond Farm in Wilmot, New Hampshire, […]

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“Academic Ableism” Author Interview–Part 2

by Kathryn Beaton December 15, 2017

Check out Part 2 of our interview with Jay Timothy Dolmage. He’s an Associate Professor of English at the University of Waterloo and author of the newly released book Academic Ableism: Disability and Higher Education, which argues that inclusiveness allows for a better education for everyone. We are proud to offer a large selection of disability studies books, and feel that they are essential to dispelling misconceptions. Find Part 1 of the interview here.   You write about how, for many years, “disability has been constructed as the antithesis of higher education, often positioned as a distraction, a drain, a problem to […]

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Remembering the 1967 Detroit Riot, part 5: “All that was hidden burning on the oil-stained earth”

by Brian Matzke July 23, 2017

“All that was hidden burning on the oil-stained earth”: Detroit since the riot Don’t Ask Philip Levine So Ask Essays, Conversations, and Interviews Philip Levine The Bread of Time Toward an Autobiography Philip Levine Detroit Is No Dry Bones The Eternal City of the Industrial Age Camilo José Vergara The Unreal Estate Guide to Detroit Andrew Herscher The legacy of the riots can be felt in the poetry of the U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Philip Levine, whose “They Feed They Lion” was inspired by his visit to his hometown of Detroit after the riots, and his feelings […]

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Black History Month Sale: 30% off select books!

by Kathryn Beaton February 8, 2017

In honor of Black History Month, we’re highlighting books in our “African-American and African Studies” category. Whether you’re interested in civil rights, slam poetry, policy issues, music, or how these intersect with a variety of other topics, you can find it all here. Use the code UMBHM17 for 30% off any of our 140 AAAS books. This offer is good on hardcovers, paperbacks, and ebooks, and can be used as many times as you want, until March 1st, 2017.   Black America in the Shadow of the Sixties: Notes on the Civil Rights Movement, Neoliberalism, and Politics Clarence Lang The 1960s, including […]

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