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Amy Cook (“Building Character”) on the Oscars

by Kathryn Beaton March 1, 2018

Our author Amy Cook, an Associate Professor of English and Theatre Arts at Stony Brook University, recently answered some questions about her new book, Building Character: The Art and Science of Casting.   Films play a prominent role in your book’s examination of casting choices. When you look over the list of nominees for this year’s Academy Awards in acting, what casting choices stand out as exceptional? Some of these actors originated the roles they are in: there was no other Lady Bird or Elisa Esposito before Saoirse Ronan and Sally Hawkins were cast in those roles. Other actors are […]

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Announcing Winner of 2017 Tobin Siebers Prize

by Kathryn Beaton January 10, 2018

The University of Michigan Press is pleased to announce that the 2017 Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities has been awarded to Elizabeth B. Bearden for her book manuscript Monstrous Kinds: Body, Space, and Narrative in Renaissance Representations of Disability. Dr. Bearden lives in Madison, Wisconson, where she is a Professor of English at UW-Madison. She earned her Ph. D. in Comparative Literature from New York University in 2006. Her first book, published in 2012 by the University of Toronto Press, is The Emblematics of the Self: Ekphrasis and Identity in Renaissance Imitations of Greek Romance. In her […]

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U-M Humanities Collaboratory funds “Book Unbound” project to improve the practice of digital publication in the humanities

by Charles Watkinson August 29, 2017

A group of five faculty members from English Language and Literature, Classical Studies, and Screen Arts and Cultures have been awarded $475,000 for a two year project starting September 1, 2017, to collaboratively study and improve the practice of digital publication in the humanities. The grant comes from the Humanities Collaboratory at the University of Michigan, established in 2015 by Provost Martha Pollack to provide resources for humanities scholars to experiment with collaborative, team-based approaches to humanities research, its communication to the broader public, and the training of the next generation of humanities scholars. Entitled “The Book Unbound” this ambitious […]

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Interview: Francesca Coppa, “The Fanfiction Reader: Folk Tales for the Digital Age”

by Kathryn Beaton August 29, 2017

Our author Francesca Coppa recently answered questions from our editorial director, Mary Francis, about her new book The Fanfiction Reader: Folk Tales for the Digital Age.    When I first got the manuscript for this book I couldn’t stop reading: some of these writers are just great storytellers.  Was it hard to choose among the fanfic you know and love? Oh, it was brutal, actually; there’s so much terrific fanfiction out there you wouldn’t believe it.  And there’s no way anyone can read all of it.  So I had to set rules very quickly. Length was a big one: these stories […]

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Remembering the 1967 Detroit Riot, part 5: “All that was hidden burning on the oil-stained earth”

by Brian Matzke July 23, 2017

“All that was hidden burning on the oil-stained earth”: Detroit since the riot Don’t Ask Philip Levine So Ask Essays, Conversations, and Interviews Philip Levine The Bread of Time Toward an Autobiography Philip Levine Detroit Is No Dry Bones The Eternal City of the Industrial Age Camilo José Vergara The Unreal Estate Guide to Detroit Andrew Herscher The legacy of the riots can be felt in the poetry of the U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Philip Levine, whose “They Feed They Lion” was inspired by his visit to his hometown of Detroit after the riots, and his feelings […]

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