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Interview with Poet and Professor Philip Metres

by Kathryn Beaton October 1, 2018

Our new Fulcrum Community Manager, Emma DiPasquale, studied under our author Philip Metres at John Carroll University. Below, she interviews him about his new book The Sound of Listening: Poetry as Refuge and Resistance, which was released in September. He also will be visiting Ann Arbor to read (with author Aimee Bender) on November 15.   You join over a hundred other poets who have contributed to the Poets on Poetry series. What drew you to it? When I was in graduate school researching poets and the peace movement, I first encountered the series through volumes by the poet William Stafford: You […]

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Celebrating 20 Years of Corporealities

by Charles Watkinson October 11, 2016

On October 11 author Ann McGuire gives the inaugural Tobin Siebers Prize Lecture at the University of Michigan. Professor McGuire is the winner of the inaugural Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies, named in honor of the pioneering scholar and father of disability studies. In the blog post below, Professor David Mitchell of George Washington University, co-editor of the successful book series Corporealities (in which McGuire’s book appears) reflects on the series’ contribution to the field. Corporealities: Discourses of Disability Series Overview will turn 20 years old in 2017. It is now the longest running academic book series devoted exclusively […]

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Black History Month Spotlight: ‘Counting the Tiger’s Teeth’

by Kasie Pleiness February 24, 2016

Throughout February, the University of Michigan Press will be featuring several titles for Black History Month. Counting the Tiger’s Teeth: An African Teenager’s Story narrates a crucial turning point in Nigerian history, the Agbekoya rebellion of 1968-70. After dropping out of high school in 1968, Toyin Falola joined a peasant rebellion in his home country of Nigeria. Counting the Tiger’s Teeth is Falola’s personal account of his experience with the rebellion, based on what he saw and heard, the activities he participated in, and what he suffered. The narrative provides unprecedented, even poetic, access to the social fabric and dynamic development of […]

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The World of Childhood

by Phillip Witteveen February 11, 2015

“For centuries, in Western civilization,” says Ellen Handler Spitz, “children were not really understood to have an inner life at all. Nobody paid attention really… childhood was seen as a preparatory stage of life for adulthood. Children were dressed as little adults—and what they produced when they were little was of no interest.” Spitz, the author of Illuminating Childhood, was recently featured on CBC Radio One to discuss this: the scientifically under-specified “inner life” of children: the locus of Spitz’ own research in aesthetics and psychology. Dr. Spitz’ work—and the whole radio hour—are really the same response to the puzzling nature of childhood. Psychologically, childhood is […]

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From the Vault: U.S. Responsibility to the “Free Peoples of the Globe”

by Mikala Carpenter August 29, 2013

Our “From the Vault” posts allow you to take a peek into the history of the Press, where you can rediscover past authors, projects, editors, awards, and more that led to the development of the university publisher that the Press is today. This window into our past spotlights backlist or out-of-print titles and series and also recommends and contextualizes them with similar current and forthcoming titles. Explore the drawers of the Vault with our intern, Mikala Carpenter, as we uncover the hidden treasures that await us in the archives of the University of Michigan Press. “To be a fit partner […]

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