Podcast

New York Times calls Karlawish’s historical novel “marvelous”

by Shaun Manning November 29, 2011

The New York Times reviewed Dr. Jason Karlawish’s historical novel Open Wound: The Tragic Obsession of Dr. William Beaumont, praising its precise treatment of the doctor/patient relationship–in particular, the unique doctor/patient relationship that existed between frontier physicial Dr. William Beaumont and gut-shot trapper Alexis St. Martin in the early 19th century. Setting the unusual circumstances of Beaumont’s care in the context of more familiar terms–and suggesting that, despite radical advancements in the fields of medicine, some things never change–the Times said: The relationship between doctor and patient is hard enough to parse when both are in the same room. When […]

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Q&A with Jennifer Gabrys, author of Digital Rubbish

by University of Michigan Press July 5, 2011

Digital Rubbish: A Natural History of Electronics describes the materiality of electronics from a unique perspective, examining the multiple forms of waste that electronics create as evidence of the resources, labor, and imaginaries that are bundled into these machines. By drawing on the material analysis developed by Walter Benjamin, this natural history method allows for an inquiry into electronics that focuses neither on technological progression nor on great inventors but rather considers the ways in which electronic technologies fail and decay. Ranging across studies of media and technology, as well as environments, geography, and design, Jennifer Gabrys pulls together the […]

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Vodcast with Sara Fitzgerald, author of “Elly Peterson: Mother of the Moderates”

by Bridget June 15, 2011

This is a vodcast with Sara Fitzgerald, the author of the forthcoming University of Michigan Press title, Elly Peterson: “Mother” of the Moderates. It chronicles the life and political history of Elly Peterson, one of the highest ranking women in the Republican Party. In 1964 she ran for a Michigan seat in the U.S. Senate and became the first woman to serve as chair of the Michigan Republican Party. During the 1960s she grew disenchanted with the increasing conservatism of her party, united with other feminists to push for the Equal Rights Amendment and reproductive choice, battled Phyllis Schlafly to prevent her […]

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Q&A with Theo Cateforis, author of Are We Not New Wave?

by University of Michigan Press May 4, 2011

New wave emerged at the turn of the 1980s as a pop music movement cast in the image of punk rock’s sneering demeanor, yet rendered more accessible and sophisticated. Artists such as the Cars, Devo, the Talking Heads, and the Human League leapt into the Top 40 with a novel sound that broke with the staid rock clichés of the 1970s and pointed the way to a more modern pop style. In Are We Not New Wave? Theo Cateforis provides the first musical and cultural history of the new wave movement, charting its rise out of mid-1970s punk to its […]

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Q&A with Greg Nelson, author of Michigan Ice Hockey

by University of Michigan Press December 8, 2010

College ice hockey is one of the fastest, most entertaining sports on earth. Ann Arbor is home of the University of Michigan, the program that has won more collegiate hockey championships than any other. Michigan Ice Hockey is a fan’s ultimate guide, telling the story of the program from its first, humble days of skating outdoors on the frozen Huron River, to today’s competitions on the best rinks in the nation. It covers everything from leading scores to tournament results to NHL player alumni. It’s a love story for those conquering heroes on skates, the traditions and trivia that surround […]

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