curriculum

Announcing the Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities

by Shaun Manning March 26, 2015

The Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities The work of the late Tobin Siebers has influenced Disability Studies in field-shifting ways since the publication of his prize-winning essay “My Withered Limb” in 1998. His subsequent scholarly publications including the books Disability Theory (2008) and Disability Aesthetics (2010) as well as essays such as “A Sexual Culture for Disabled People” (2012) quickly became pivotal works in the field. Siebers’s work has galvanized new scholarship in relation to questions of representation, subjectivity, and the entry of non-normative bodies into public space, and made the study of disability a central […]

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From the Vault: A Glimpse at the Original Poets on Poetry Volumes

by Mikala Carpenter July 8, 2013

Our “From the Vault” posts allow you to take a peek into the history of the Press, where you can rediscover past authors, projects, editors, awards, and more that led to the development of the university publisher that the Press is today. This window into our past spotlights backlist or out-of-print titles and series and also recommends and contextualizes them with similar current and forthcoming titles. Explore the drawers of the Vault with our intern, Mikala Carpenter, as we uncover the hidden treasures that await us in the archives of the University of Michigan Press.  One of the Press’s most […]

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‘Teaching about Religions’ author favors balanced religious courses in public schools

by Heather Newman April 29, 2011

Emile Lester is author of Teaching about Religions, a brand-new book on religious education in public schools from the University of Michigan Press. He speaks here about how religions can be incorporated into a public school curriculum. Recent attempts by Texas state school board members to accommodate conservative Christian concerns in the social studies and science curriculums have produced predictable handwringing among many liberals and secularists.  These groups have responded by emphasizing the need to teach evolution only and insulate the public school curriculum from conservative Christian biases. These groups’ concerns are not unwarranted.  Still, in Teaching Religions: A Democratic […]

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Q&A with Irene Taviss Thomson, author of Culture Wars and Enduring American Dilemmas

by University of Michigan Press April 1, 2010

The idea of a culture war, or wars, has existed in America since the 1960s—an underlying ideological schism in our country that is responsible for the polarizing debates on everything from the separation of church and state, to abortion, to gay marriage, to affirmative action. Irene Taviss Thomson explores this notion by analyzing hundreds of articles addressing hot-button issues over two decades from four magazines: National Review, Time, The New Republic, and The Nation, as well as a wide array of other writings and statements from a substantial number of public intellectuals. Irene Taviss Thomson is Professor Emeritus of Sociology, […]

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Q&A with Ilan Stavans, author of A Critic’s Journey

by University of Michigan Press January 5, 2010

Ilan Stavans has been a lightning rod for cultural discussion and criticism his entire career. In A Critic’s Journey, he takes on his own Jewish and Hispanic upbringing with an autobiographical focus and his typical flair with words, exploring the relationship between the two cultures from his own and also others’ experiences. Stavans has been hailed as a voice for Latino culture thanks to his Hispanic upbringing, but as a Jew and a Caucasian, he’s also an outsider to that culture —something that’s sharpened his perspective (and some of his critics’ swords). In this book of essays, he looks at […]

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