Remembering Gordon Tullock

by Carolyn Darr November 14, 2014
Calculus of Consent by James M. Buchanan and Gordon Tullock

Gordon Tullock, one of the founding fathers of public choice theory, passed away November 4th at the age of 92. Originally intending to be a foreign trader, Tullock only took one economics class in his university studies, yet went on to completely change economic thinking by applying it to political issues. Along with his long time collaborator James Buchanan, Tullock produced The Calculus of Consent: Logical Foundations of Constitutional Democracy, a groundbreaking work in the new field of public choice. Growing up in Rockford, Illinois, Tullock attended the University of Chicago where he earned a J.D. in 1947 after serving […]

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Celebrating University Press Week: November 9-16

by Phillip Witteveen November 10, 2014

The publishing community celebrates University Press Week November 9-16, 2014. University presses provide access to ideas, playing a unique role in fostering scholarship. Each university press has a diverse list of titles, shaped by their history, directors, acquisitions editors, location, and parent institutions. With titles ranging from maritime studies to folklore and field guides, the unique history and culture of the Mitten State and its Great Lakes are traced in print via the publishing activity of our three university presses. From Michigan State University Press: Beyond Pontiac’s Shadow provides a fresh look at an important moment in the history of Michigan and Canada. Brian […]

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In Memoriam: Galway Kinnell

by Phillip Witteveen November 7, 2014
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Galway Kinnell – Pulitzer winning poet, essayist and teacher – died October 28, 2014 at age 87. He was a big, square-jawed guy, the kind it might seem you could blunt iron against; he wrote with the soul of a river or a son of Abraham. He did all this at a time of emergent New Criticism (after the advent and aftermath of Pound and Eliot’s Modernism), but didn’t seem to mind it too much (“it” in this case referring to “the sorting algorithm of popular culture”). He was more into the timeless stuff, or maybe better put, the stuff […]

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Simi Linton’s ‘Invitation to Dance’ to screen at Moscow film festival

by Phillip Witteveen October 24, 2014
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In 1971, Simi Linton was in a car accident. She lost her husband, her best friend, and the use of her legs. From that day on, she was in a new category. Once a dancer, a student, and an activist, now she would have to navigate all of these social places as a disabled person, too, and in an America that didn’t quite know what to think of her. In a word, she did. And with so much personal inertia that she began to align the movement advocating for social justice. Linton holds a Ph.D., has authored several books, and […]

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Guest blog: Maleficent Maternity

by Shaun Manning October 14, 2014
Maleficent New Poster (2)

The following essay was written by Natasha Saje, whose Windows and Doors: A Poet Reads Literary Theory, was published by the University of Michigan Press in August. I don’t expect feminism from Disney, but The New York Times and Salon praised the film Maleficent as “a new kind of story” and “subversive.”  In fact, however, this Sleeping Beauty tale merely replaces the jealous older woman with another stereotype, the selfless mother. And that stereotype is so engrained in U.S. culture, even prominent film reviewers don’t see it. Maleficent, “strongest of the fairies,” is played by Angelina Jolie. In what is symbolically a date rape, Maleficent loses […]

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