1970s

In Memoriam: Galway Kinnell

by Phillip Witteveen November 7, 2014
On the Poetry of Galway Kinnell

Galway Kinnell—Pulitzer winning poet, essayist and teacher—died October 28, 2014 at age 87. He was a big, square-jawed guy, the kind it seemed you could blunt iron against; he wrote with the soul of a river, or a son of Abraham. He did all this at a time of emergent New Criticism (after the advent and aftermath of Pound and Eliot’s Modernism), but didn’t seem too bothered with theories in vogue at the time, according, as they were, to the sorting algorithm of popular culture. He was more into the timeless stuff, or maybe better put, the stuff of timelessness. […]

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Simi Linton’s ‘Invitation to Dance’ to Screen at Moscow Film Festival

by Phillip Witteveen October 24, 2014

In 1971, Simi Linton was in a car accident. She lost her husband, her best friend, and the use of her legs. From that day on, she was in a new category. Once a dancer, a student, and an activist—now she would have to navigate all these social places as a disabled person, too—and in an America that didn’t quite know what to think of the disabled, culturally, institutionally. Basically, she did. And with so much personal inertia that she began to align a movement advocating for social justice in her wake. Linton holds a Ph.D., has authored several books, and is the […]

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Guest blog: Maleficent Maternity

by Shaun Manning October 14, 2014

The following essay was written by Natasha Saje, whose Windows and Doors: A Poet Reads Literary Theory, was published by the University of Michigan Press in August. I don’t expect feminism from Disney, but The New York Times and Salon praised the film Maleficent as “a new kind of story” and “subversive.”  In fact, however, this Sleeping Beauty tale merely replaces the jealous older woman with another stereotype, the selfless mother. And that stereotype is so engrained in U.S. culture, even prominent film reviewers don’t see it. Maleficent, “strongest of the fairies,” is played by Angelina Jolie. In what is symbolically a date rape, Maleficent loses […]

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Charles Wright named Poet Laureate

by Shaun Manning June 12, 2014

Charles Wright, author of nearly two dozen books of poetry as well as two volumes in the University of Michigan Press’s Poets on Poetry series, has been named America’s Poet Laureate by the Library of Congress, as reported by the New York Times. Wright’s books of criticism with the Press include Quarter Notes: Improvisation and Interviews and Halflife: Improvisations and Interviews, 1977-87. “I’m very honored and flattered to be picked, but also somewhat confused,” Wright told the Times. “I really don’t know what I’m supposed to do. But as soon as I find out, I’ll do it.” Two years ago, the Poet […]

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From the Vault: U.S. Responsibility to the “Free Peoples of the Globe”

by Mikala Carpenter August 29, 2013

Our “From the Vault” posts allow you to take a peek into the history of the Press, where you can rediscover past authors, projects, editors, awards, and more that led to the development of the university publisher that the Press is today. This window into our past spotlights backlist or out-of-print titles and series and also recommends and contextualizes them with similar current and forthcoming titles. Explore the drawers of the Vault with our intern, Mikala Carpenter, as we uncover the hidden treasures that await us in the archives of the University of Michigan Press. “To be a fit partner […]

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