economics

Remembering the 1967 Detroit Riot, part 5: “All that was hidden burning on the oil-stained earth”

by Brian Matzke July 23, 2017

“All that was hidden burning on the oil-stained earth”: Detroit since the riot Don’t Ask Philip Levine So Ask Essays, Conversations, and Interviews Philip Levine The Bread of Time Toward an Autobiography Philip Levine Detroit Is No Dry Bones The Eternal City of the Industrial Age Camilo José Vergara The Unreal Estate Guide to Detroit Andrew Herscher The legacy of the riots can be felt in the poetry of the U.S. Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Philip Levine, whose “They Feed They Lion” was inspired by his visit to his hometown of Detroit after the riots, and his feelings […]

Read more

Remembering Gordon Tullock

by Carolyn Darr November 14, 2014
Calculus of Consent by James M. Buchanan and Gordon Tullock

Gordon Tullock, one of the founding fathers of public choice theory, passed away November 4th at the age of 92. Originally intending to be a foreign trader, Tullock only took one economics class in his university studies, yet went on to completely change economic thinking by applying it to political issues. Along with his long time collaborator James Buchanan, Tullock produced The Calculus of Consent: Logical Foundations of Constitutional Democracy, a groundbreaking work in the new field of public choice. Growing up in Rockford, Illinois, Tullock attended the University of Chicago where he earned a J.D. in 1947 after serving […]

Read more

Three Press Titles Included in Knowledge Unlatched Pilot Collection

by Meredith Kahn October 9, 2013

Knowledge Unlatched–a project to fund open access monographs in the humanities and social sciences published by academic presses—has released its pilot collection, twenty-eight new books from thirteen presses. The University of Michigan Press is excited to participate in this project, with the inclusion of three titles: Law, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Terrorism, Roger Douglas Roger Douglas compares responses to terrorism by five liberal democracies—the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand—over the past 15 years. He examines each nation’s development and implementation of counterterrorism law, specifically in the areas of information-gathering, the definition of terrorist offenses, […]

Read more

From the Vault: Press Awards from 2003-2008

by Mikala Carpenter August 14, 2013

Our “From the Vault” posts allow you to take a peek into the history of the Press, where you can rediscover past authors, projects, editors, awards, and more that led to the development of the university publisher that the Press is today. This window into our past spotlights backlist or out-of-print titles and series and also recommends and contextualizes them with similar current and forthcoming titles. Explore the drawers of the Vault with our intern, Mikala Carpenter, as we uncover the hidden treasures that await us in the archives of the University of Michigan Press. This is the first of […]

Read more

Henry Bial Defends the Ph.D. in Theater

by Phillip Witteveen February 22, 2013

In a recent essay for the Chronicle of Higher Education, Henry Bial, author of Acting Jewish: Negotiating Ethnicity on the American Stage and Screen, responded to growing concerns within the academy relating to doctorate programs in the performing arts.  There is, according to Bial and the article’s c0-authors, “an antagonism between those who study the theater and those who create it.” This issue falls hardest on those students “enrolled in 36 doctoral programs in theater across the country.”  Bial and his co-authors promoted a separation between the inherent value and marketability of the degree, saying,  “market value is a flawed metric for both the M.F.A. […]

Read more