gender studies

Interview with William Cheng, winner of the 2016 AMS Philip Brett Award

by Sam Killian November 11, 2016

We at University of Michigan Press are pleased to share that William Cheng’s new book, Just Vibrations: The Purpose of Sounding Good, received this year’s Philip Brett Award from the American Musicological Society. Philip Brett (1937–2002) was a beloved professor and a pioneer of queer music scholarship. The book, an urgent treatise on the ethical stakes of contemporary musical scholarship and citizenship, was celebrated during the AMS annual meeting. During this meeting (which happened to take place this year in Cheng’s hometown of Vancouver, British Columbia), the Society praised Just Vibrations, calling it “a nuanced and intersectional work that meets concerns […]

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Celebrate Pride with UM Press

by Lauren Stachew June 23, 2016

This month is the 47th annual LGBT Pride Month, which began in June 1969 to commemorate the Stonewall riots in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village. This commemorative month not only celebrates sexual diversity and gender variance, but also increases visibility and emphasizes positivity and self-love in the LGBT community. Parades, marches, rallies, and commemorations are held across the world annually during this month. Performing Queer Latinidad by Ramón H. Rivera-Servera highlights the critical role that performance played in the development of Latina/o queer public culture in the United States during the 1990s and early 2000s, a period when the size and influence […]

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Emily Wilding Davison and the British Women’s Suffragette Movement

by Kasie Pleiness November 19, 2015

Suffragette, starring Carey Mulligan and Meryl Streep, is a British historical drama inspired by true events from the early British feminist movement. The film focuses on Maud Watts, a fictional 24-year-old laundress who testifies in front of Parliament for the right to vote. She is thrown in jail, where she meets Emily Wilding Davison, a real life heroine of the early feminist movement and friend of activist Emmeline Pankhurst. Davison was at the center of one of the most memorable images of the British women’s suffrage movement — one that provides a key moment in the new film. On June […]

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Gayle Greene on Doris Lessing

by Meredith Kahn December 4, 2013

Gayle Greene, author of Doris Lessing: The Poetics of Change, recently wrote about the impact of Doris Lessing’s work for Ms. Magazine’s blog: It would be difficult to overstate the impact The Golden Notebook had on women of my generation, the direct and immediate identification we felt with it, the thrill of recognition. Here was a protagonist struggling with commitments to herself, her work, a child, relationships, political activism, “living the kind of life women never lived before.” Protagonist Anna Wulf describes herself as “the position of women in our time,” and for many of us this was no exaggeration. — Gayle […]

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From the Vault: Press Awards from 2009-2013

by Mikala Carpenter August 26, 2013

Our “From the Vault” posts allow you to take a peek into the history of the Press, where you can rediscover past authors, projects, editors, awards, and more that led to the development of the university publisher that the Press is today. This window into our past spotlights backlist or out-of-print titles and series and also recommends and contextualizes them with similar current and forthcoming titles. Explore the drawers of the Vault with our intern, Mikala Carpenter, as we uncover the hidden treasures that await us in the archives of the University of Michigan Press. This is the second of […]

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