poetry

Pub Club hosts successful inaugural event

by Allison Peters February 11, 2016

On Thursday, February 4, 2016, Michigan Publishing and the University of Michigan Library Staff Forum Board collaborated to host the first meeting of the Michigan Library Publishing Club (“Pub Club”), a new quarterly event series, open to the public at the Hatcher Graduate Library Gallery, devoted to discussing open access titles published by the University of Michigan Press. For our inaugural event, the Pub Club discussed American Homes, a 2014 mixed-genre book of poetry, prose, illustrations, and aphorisms by Ryan Ridge, published within the 21st Century Prose series of the digitalculturebooks imprint. Unique among most U-M Press titles, American Homes can […]

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Sales on New Titles from U-M Press

by Shaun Manning October 20, 2015

Are you on University of Michigan Press’s email lists? If so, you’ll know about the great deals we offer on all of our latest titles to help you keep up with the latest research in your field. If you haven’t yet signed up, here are a few promotion codes to get you started — enter them at checkout to save 30% on any edition of the title! Reading for the Planet: Toward a Geomethodology by Christian Moraru – code UMPLANET Campaign Finance and Political Polarization: When Purists Prevail by Raymond J. La Raja and Brian F. Schaffner – code UMPURIST […]

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Publishing, Poetry, and the Future: Reflecting on the 2015 Bear River Writers’ Conference

by Allison Peters July 27, 2015

The weekend May sprung into June, I attended the 2015 Bear River Writers’ Conference at Camp Michigania up on Walloon Lake (where Ernest Hemingway used to spend his summers as a kid), 250 miles north of Ann Arbor, a little south of Petoskey. Sponsored by the University of Michigan Department of English, Bear River is rich with writing workshops, readings, panels (often related to publishing), and craft talks. Directed by University of Michigan faculty member and poet Keith Taylor, the annual conference—now in its fifteenth year—is regularly attended by some of the University’s most prestigious creative writing faculty as well […]

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Philip Levine, 1928-2015

by Phillip Witteveen February 20, 2015

Philip Levine passed away over the weekend, on Saturday the 14th. His poetry was recognized with two National Book Awards, a Pulitzer, and with an appointment as a U.S. poet laureate. Levine was one of the first (and most prominent) poets to really put his hometown, Detroit, into verse. He found a plainspoken language to mourn with, to give pause, to join rafters in his native mise en scène—a language to tell stories of people just getting off the graveyard shift. He started writing poetry when he was only thirteen. In Levine’s work, there was always a way of recognizing aspects of the everyday as poetry; in […]

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In Memoriam: Galway Kinnell

by Phillip Witteveen November 7, 2014
On the Poetry of Galway Kinnell

Galway Kinnell—Pulitzer winning poet, essayist and teacher—died October 28, 2014 at age 87. He was a big, square-jawed guy, the kind it seemed you could blunt iron against; he wrote with the soul of a river, or a son of Abraham. He did all this at a time of emergent New Criticism (after the advent and aftermath of Pound and Eliot’s Modernism), but didn’t seem too bothered with theories in vogue at the time, according, as they were, to the sorting algorithm of popular culture. He was more into the timeless stuff, or maybe better put, the stuff of timelessness. […]

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